Journal Book – Nalburiye Dergisi http://nalburiyedergisi.com/ Tue, 28 Jun 2022 04:12:22 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://nalburiyedergisi.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Journal Book – Nalburiye Dergisi http://nalburiyedergisi.com/ 32 32 Thirty-five years ago, his class buried a time capsule. Now a former Lewiston teacher looks back on the best years of her teaching career https://nalburiyedergisi.com/thirty-five-years-ago-his-class-buried-a-time-capsule-now-a-former-lewiston-teacher-looks-back-on-the-best-years-of-her-teaching-career/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 23:50:20 +0000 https://nalburiyedergisi.com/thirty-five-years-ago-his-class-buried-a-time-capsule-now-a-former-lewiston-teacher-looks-back-on-the-best-years-of-her-teaching-career/ Chloe Giampaolo poses June 20 next to the mast where a 50-year-old time capsule was buried outside Montello Elementary School in Lewiston on May 29, 1987. She was a fourth grade teacher when the capsule containing the treasures of 23 of her students was buried. It will be unearthed in 2037. Daryn Slover/Sun Diary LEWISTON […]]]>

Chloe Giampaolo poses June 20 next to the mast where a 50-year-old time capsule was buried outside Montello Elementary School in Lewiston on May 29, 1987. She was a fourth grade teacher when the capsule containing the treasures of 23 of her students was buried. It will be unearthed in 2037. Daryn Slover/Sun Diary

LEWISTON — It has been 35 years since Chloe Giampaolo’s fourth-grade class buried a time capsule outside Montello Elementary School on East Avenue.

Thirty-five years since a 1987 Guinness Book of World Records, a map of Lewiston and Auburn, a photo album, several letters and more have been sealed, lying in wait.

And there, the capsule will remain for another 15 years until 2037, when students and staff will unearth the ordinary treasures left to them by 23 fourth-grade students in 1987.

In a ceremony recorded by his son, Giampaolo’s students stood up one by one to read their letter to the Montello students of 2037. The letter described simple aspects of their daily lives: their style of dress, their favorite foods, popular music and the common schoolyard. Games.

But the letter delves deeper, expressing the students’ fears, ones that remain remarkably similar to today’s concerns.

“Have you solved the pollution problem? asked the children. “The threat of nuclear war terrifies us,” they added. “We’re afraid that while we’re at school there might be missiles flying overhead right now.”

“We are afraid that our fathers or our brothers will be forced to return to war. We remember people who went to Vietnam and never came back.

The letter was written entirely by his students, Giampaolo said, and every element was chosen with care. His students called companies and knocked on doors to collect all the elements needed for the capsule. A local funeral director donated the wooden coffin to protect the capsule, a metal cylinder no more than 3 feet tall.

“I never pushed anything on my kids,” she said. “I would discuss things with them and tell them that you know those are the possibilities of what we could do, but I always left it to my students to decide if they wanted to do it.”

At the end of the ceremony, each of their class released letters into the sky attached to balloons.

“We need to understand our past as we look to the future because it can help us make decisions. And I think those kids made a lot of good decisions,” Giampaolo said.

Inside and outside the classroom, Giampaolo is a remarkable woman. She has a master’s degree from Morgan State University, a historically black public university, has written six books and has traveled to all seven continents.

An article about the time capsule buried at Montello Elementary School in Lewiston was published in the Lewiston Journal on May 29, 1987. Lewiston newspaper file photo

No other school gave him the freedom and support to go beyond the established curriculum than the administrators of Monetello.

“I had the best teaching of my career here in Lewiston at Montello Elementary,” she said.

While Montello’s time capsule may be the most enduring endeavor of Giampaolo’s 30-year teaching career, it was by no means her only notable undertaking. During the half-dozen years she taught at Montello in the 1980s, Giampaolo students made headlines for a number of experiential learning projects.

In 1985, Montello’s entire fourth-grade class participated in Maine Native American Day, an event hosted by Giampaolo. Students learned about Maine’s indigenous culture and heritage from 15 youth and four adults from the Penobscot Nation who came to Montello for the day.

At the time, Giampaolo said she came up with the idea because she was “dissatisfied with the Maine Indian material” while teaching Maine history to her students, according to the Lewiston Journal.

Students help David Heller of the Traveling Tipi Museum erect an 18-foot tipi at Montello Elementary School in Lewiston in 1985. File photo by George Wardwell/Lewiston Journal

“Our kids are growing up with so many stereotypes,” she shared in 1985. “The main focus of the program is to unlearn stereotypes.”

One of his classes wrote about their three main fears – death, divorce and nuclear disaster – which was later published in book form by the Geiger brothers. She has also partnered with Bates College in Lewiston to bring her students to the school’s science labs for hands-on learning in geology, biology, chemistry, astronomy and physics.

“When I could see a change in a student, not just, you know, what they were doing in terms of schoolwork, but even emotionally,” she said. “Look at the child as a whole and see things change. Watching a child switch from one way of thinking to another was very important to me.

She left Montello in 1988 for a better paying position in Maryland. But she quickly quits the profession of writer because her new school does not allow her to teach as she did in Montello.

“Children don’t come to school to learn how to pass an exam,” she says. “My kids (in Montello) used to look at the clock and say, ‘Oh, hell, three. We have to go home already. You know, they wanted to be there.

“Tom Hood was the best director I could have had, of all the different directors I’ve had in my life,” she added. “He was very encouraging and very cooperative in many ways.”

The time capsule buried in 1987 by Chloe Giampaolo’s fourth grade class at Montello Elementary School in Lewiston will be unearthed in 2037. Daryn Slover/Sun Diary

In 2037, few will remember Montello as it was in the 1980s. Giampaolo’s fourth-grade students will be 60 years old, give or take a year.

“I’ll be an old lady!” said Danielle Smith. In 1987, she was 11, according to The Lewiston Journal.

Although marked by a granite stone, Giampaolo sometimes worries that the community forgets the time capsule. Although she probably won’t live to see the day it is discovered, she hopes some of her former students will be there to celebrate their work.

“I’m very, very proud of them,” Giampaolo said. “I may never see them again. But, you know, they will always be close to my heart.


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Boria Majumdar’s book reveals ex-IPL boss Lalit Modi’s high-flying lifestyle https://nalburiyedergisi.com/boria-majumdars-book-reveals-ex-ipl-boss-lalit-modis-high-flying-lifestyle/ Sun, 26 Jun 2022 11:30:04 +0000 https://nalburiyedergisi.com/boria-majumdars-book-reveals-ex-ipl-boss-lalit-modis-high-flying-lifestyle/ S-class Mercedes cars were to be made available in Dharamsala and Nagpur when now-fugitive Lalit Modi visited those cities during his tenure as IPL commissioner as he would not be driving any other model, says a new book. In “Maverick Commissioner: The IPL-Lalit Modi Saga”, Boria Majumdar also writes that once Modi left the country […]]]>

S-class Mercedes cars were to be made available in Dharamsala and Nagpur when now-fugitive Lalit Modi visited those cities during his tenure as IPL commissioner as he would not be driving any other model, says a new book.

In “Maverick Commissioner: The IPL-Lalit Modi Saga”, Boria Majumdar also writes that once Modi left the country in May 2010, the hotel sent an invoice amount to BCCI which remained unpaid and to the board of directors. administration, which then had no sympathy. left for him, refused to erase it.

According to the author, these are examples for which the IPL has continued to be hated by many.

Despite cricket and the brand’s rising value, vulgar displays of opulence were always going to be an eyesore, he says.

High on success

“Lalit, who was riding high on success, didn’t see the writing on the wall and suffice it to say he became a victim of his own long-term success. In fact, for him those things were a Glamor and opulence were at the very core of the league’s existence and for Lalit, his actions were essential in making the IPL what it turned out to be,” he wrote.

The success of the first two seasons of IPL meant that Lalit Modi had risen to prominence and it was all down to his high-flying lifestyle, claims Majumdar.

“The vine says that for a match in Dharamsala which Lalit attended, his office had booked two Mercedes S-class cars from Delhi which drove to Himachal before landing there. He would not drive any other model and such an extravagance was become routine with Lalit,” he wrote.

It wasn’t the only time something as bizarre as this happened, the author says. “On another occasion, when he traveled to Nagpur to meet (Shashank Venkatesh) Manohar and watch an IPL match, his office had called to arrange for an S-class Mercedes. When told that the model n was not available in Nagpur, they booked a car from Hyderabad, which was driven to Orange City for Lalit to use,” he wrote.

Undisputed boss

Reserving an entire floor of a five-star hotel for himself had become second nature and no one within BCCI had the courage to object, according to the book published by Simon & Schuster. “Was he paying for the hotel out of his own funds or was it all at BCCI’s expense? Such questions did not arise and if anyone did, he would invoke the ire of the establishment. Lalit Modi had become synonymous with questioning the IPL and with the league generating record funds for the BCCI, no criticism of any kind was welcome,” Majumdar writes.

The book goes on to describe how the IPL, which was perhaps the biggest gamble of Lalit Modi’s life, turned out to be the greatest achievement of all time, making him a cult figure in the sporting echelons. global. “And by creating the IPL, Modi ended up breathing new life into cricket in India and beyond. Cricketers found a new voice and marketers found a new investment opportunity. Broadcasters found a magical product and BCCI has found its golden goose.

“While Modi had to give up everything within a few years and leave India for good, his imprint remained, making him one of the best-known figures in the Indian cricket administration,” the report said.

Majumdar says that while there are no straight answers to many questions regarding Lalit Modi and the unsolved mysteries at key times in her life, it is important to dig deeper and seek out some of those answers.

“In doing so, you end up discovering a man who was both a genius and a maverick. His actions cannot always be described in black and white and that is what adds to the aura of Lalit Modi” , he said.

“Maverick Commissioner” is set to be made into a movie soon by Vibri Motion Pictures.

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BOOK REVIEW: ‘Lightyear’ provides insight into Buzz’s background | Entertainment https://nalburiyedergisi.com/book-review-lightyear-provides-insight-into-buzzs-background-entertainment/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 19:15:00 +0000 https://nalburiyedergisi.com/book-review-lightyear-provides-insight-into-buzzs-background-entertainment/ “Lightyear” wasn’t just another endeavor for director Angus MacLane. As we learn in “The Art of Lightyear”, this has its origins in his first viewing of “Star Wars” when he was 4 years old. MacLane fell in love with the film and its sequels and dreamed of creating his own science fiction film. Thus, the […]]]>

“Lightyear” wasn’t just another endeavor for director Angus MacLane.

As we learn in “The Art of Lightyear”, this has its origins in his first viewing of “Star Wars” when he was 4 years old.

MacLane fell in love with the film and its sequels and dreamed of creating his own science fiction film. Thus, the subsequent dive into Buzz Lightyear.

Even more special? MacLane’s father, a retired mechanical engineer, helped formulate an equation for Buzz’s first high-speed test mission. The film and the volume “the art of” are filled with connections. MacLane loved LEGOs, so there are also LEGO models of the ships used in the new movie.

In the drawing-filled book, you see all of Buzz Lightyear’s spacesuit iterations and a guide to the buttons he can press. There’s a weapons page (about 25) and so many extra characters you’ll wonder where they appear in the movie.

What’s missing, however, are specific character details and more information about Sox, the robot cat who steals the movie. He had a different look at one point, but all of his skills (including that versatile tail) are unexplained. Instead, we see it more as a prop, not a vital part of the production.

People also read…

“Art of” doesn’t reveal all of the film’s secrets but does detail the strange worlds where various spaceships happen to land. It’s like an encyclopedia of all things Lightyear, though fans may have other views on how the world looks.

A series of drawings of Buzz make him look like a burly Ken — or a leaner GI Joe. That purple thing you see him wearing is just a protective cover, not a trendy hair color.

The book doesn’t provide spoilers (unless you have a working knowledge of the movie), but it does offer revealing details about Buzz’s surroundings and Zurg’s. One has rounded corners; the other is pointed.

And there’s a font (used in the movie) that could be copied to send cool messages. Long in pictures, “The Art of Lightyear” is like a high school yearbook. You can look back many times and still see something new.

“The Art of Lightyear”, with a foreword by Andrew Stanton and an introduction by Angus MacLane, is published by Chronicle Books.

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One man’s library of banned books from Council Bluffs provides public access to ideas | Entertainment https://nalburiyedergisi.com/one-mans-library-of-banned-books-from-council-bluffs-provides-public-access-to-ideas-entertainment/ Tue, 21 Jun 2022 22:00:00 +0000 https://nalburiyedergisi.com/one-mans-library-of-banned-books-from-council-bluffs-provides-public-access-to-ideas-entertainment/ Rachel George Council Bluffs Daily Nonpareil COUNCIL BLUFFS – Sorensen’s library of banned books is open for business. A surprise 50th birthday gift from Council Bluffs resident Chris Sorensen, the small free chartered library and the books inside are made available to the public free of charge. All books in the library are selected from […]]]>

Rachel George Council Bluffs Daily Nonpareil

COUNCIL BLUFFS – Sorensen’s library of banned books is open for business.

A surprise 50th birthday gift from Council Bluffs resident Chris Sorensen, the small free chartered library and the books inside are made available to the public free of charge. All books in the library are selected from lists that various groups have tried to ban from other libraries, Sorensen said.

“The idea is amazing,” he said. “There really is no greater gift you can give someone, especially if it’s a book you’ve read and loved. There really is something special about it. .

Sorensen loves to read and is passionate about sharing books, especially the stories that people have tried to silence in the past.

“It’s important to show people that there’s another side to the story, there are people who don’t believe these books are banned,” Sorensen said. “And, to some extent, it’s a bit of resistance against those who would like to ban books or ask for books to be banned from public or school libraries.”

People also read…

Sorensen’s favorite title, “Fahrenheit 451,” is one that often appears on banned book lists. The story’s main character is a firefighter, like Sorensen, except Ray Bradbury’s Dystopian Future depicts firefighters as those who start fires and don’t put them out.

Sorensen is convinced that no book should be banned. He doesn’t believe a book is bad, or necessarily all good.

“I think it’s important to have them available to share,” he said. “Often times groups of people are banned just because they showed up on a list that someone thought didn’t fit their political agenda. Banning a book without reading it and knowing what’s in it find… I think there are thoughts that can be used in any book to develop your own thoughts and your own growth.

Sorensen called the unique gift a “total surprise,” presented to him at a law school graduation celebration for his daughter Alyson. Several of his friends and family members gave him books as gifts.

“Dad loves nothing more than connecting with people through books and bringing people out of his community,” Alyson said.

A website had been set up with a list of suggested titles, and many selected their favorites to send to the Sorensen house.

“To get a whole bunch of books all at once from friends and family — knowing that those books they donated meant something to them — it was really special,” Sorensen said.

The family ordered a Little Free Library kit online and created a private Facebook event, inviting others to participate in the giveaway with book donations.

“We were thinking a lot about the news from last year, censorship in public and private schools across the country,” Alyson said. “Thinking of Dad, his love for reading and his love for ideas, it seemed quite natural that finding a way to buck this trend would be a good gift for him.”

Sorensen also received a personalized stamp, so every book circulating in Sorensen’s Forbidden Books Library carries a piece of it.

“Ideas matter and it only takes one person to protect ideas,” Alyson said. “In my life, if there is going to be one person to protect ideas, it will be Dad. The library is in the front yard where Dad can help make sure the neighborhood kids, or people passing by, have access to books.

Since the Banned Books Library opened last month, Sorensen said he has seen books come and go. He noticed that new books have also been added.

Books can be picked up or dropped off as readers choose. They can be returned, but it is not mandatory.

“I’d rather they keep it or share it with someone else who they think would like to read this book,” he said.

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No Russian! Ukraine bans Russian music and books from public spaces and media https://nalburiyedergisi.com/no-russian-ukraine-bans-russian-music-and-books-from-public-spaces-and-media/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 07:14:46 +0000 https://nalburiyedergisi.com/no-russian-ukraine-bans-russian-music-and-books-from-public-spaces-and-media/ On Monday, Reuters reported that Ukraine’s parliament has passed two laws that will impose severe restrictions on Russian books and music as Kyiv seeks to sever the many cultural ties that remain between the two countries after Moscow’s invasion. One of the laws passed prohibits the printing of books by Russian citizens, unless they renounce […]]]>

On Monday, Reuters reported that Ukraine’s parliament has passed two laws that will impose severe restrictions on Russian books and music as Kyiv seeks to sever the many cultural ties that remain between the two countries after Moscow’s invasion.

One of the laws passed prohibits the printing of books by Russian citizens, unless they renounce their Russian passport and take Ukrainian citizenship. The ban will only apply to those who held Russian citizenship after the collapse of the Soviet regime in 1991.

It also prohibits the commercial import of books printed in Russia, Belarus and occupied Ukrainian territory, while requiring special permission for the import of books in Russian from any other country.

The other law passed bans the broadcasting of music by post-1991 Russian citizens in the media and on public transport, while increasing quotas for speech and musical content in Ukrainian on TV and radio broadcasts.

The laws must be signed by President Volodymyr Zelenskiy to take effect, although he was not heard to voice any opposition to the proposals. Both bills passed Sunday with overwhelming support, including from lawmakers traditionally seen as pro-Kremlin by most Ukrainian media and civil society.

Many who live in the eastern and southern regions of Ukraine have historically felt a strong connection to Russia, often speaking Russian as their first language.

But Russia’s invasion of Ukraine has led many Ukrainians to want to separate themselves from Russian culture.

A statement explaining the bill says Russian music would make adopting a Russian identity more appealing, potentially weakening the Ukrainian state.

The “musical product of the aggressor state [could] influence the separatist sentiment of the population,” according to the statement, quoted by lawmaker Yaroslav Zhelezniak on Telegram.

Russian widely spoken in Ukraine

Russian is the most common first language in the Donbass and Crimea regions of Ukraine and in the city of Kharkiv, and the predominant language in major cities in the eastern and southern parts of the country.

The use and status of the language are the subject of political disputes.

Ukrainian has been the only state language in the country since the adoption of the 1996 Constitution, which prohibits an official bilingual system at the state level but also guarantees the free development, use and protection of Russian and other national minority languages.

In 2017, a new education law was passed limiting the use of Russian as a language of instruction. Nevertheless, Russian remains a widely used language in Ukraine in pop culture and in informal and business communication.

“Derussification” of Ukraine

The 2017 Law on Education provides that the Ukrainian language is the language of instruction at all levels, except for one or more subjects which may be taught in two or more languages, namely English or one of the other official languages ​​of the European Union (i.e. excluding Russian).

The law states that persons belonging to the indigenous peoples of Ukraine are guaranteed the right to study in pre-school institutes and public primary schools in “the language of instruction of the respective indigenous peoples, as well as the language of instruction of state” in separate schools. classes or groups.

The Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) expressed concern about this measure and the lack of “real consultation” of representatives of national minorities.

In July 2018, the Administrative Court of Mykolaiv Okrug liquidated the status of Russian as a regional language, on the lawsuit (bringing it back to the norms of national legislation due to the recognition of the law “On the principles of the language policy of State” by the Constitutional Court of Ukraine as unconstitutional) of the First Deputy Prosecutor of Mykolaiv Oblast.

In October and December 2018, the parliaments of the city of Kherson and Kharkiv Oblast also abolished the status of the Russian language as a regional language.

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Automated peer review; “editors resign in protest”; watch out for retracted papers – Retraction Watch https://nalburiyedergisi.com/automated-peer-review-editors-resign-in-protest-watch-out-for-retracted-papers-retraction-watch/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 12:53:22 +0000 https://nalburiyedergisi.com/automated-peer-review-editors-resign-in-protest-watch-out-for-retracted-papers-retraction-watch/ OIf you are considering donating to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance. The Week at Retraction Watch featured: Our list of removed or removed COVID-19 items goes up to 237. There are over 34,000 withdrawals in our database — which feeds the withdrawal alerts in Endnote, LibKey, Papers and Zotero. And […]]]>

OIf you are considering donating to support Weekend Reads, and our daily work? Thanks in advance.

The Week at Retraction Watch featured:

Our list of removed or removed COVID-19 items goes up to 237. There are over 34,000 withdrawals in our database — which feeds the withdrawal alerts in Endnote, LibKey, Papers and Zotero. And have you seen our ranking of the authors with the most retractions lately – or our list of the 10 most cited retracted articles?

Here’s what was happening elsewhere (some of these items may be paid, have limited access, or require free registration to play):

  • “Is the future of peer review automated?” »
  • “Editors resign in protest.”
  • “This is striking because we also find that retracted articles are ubiquitous across all media, receiving more post-publication attention than unretracted articles…” Our Ivan Oransky comments on the study.
  • “The retraction of health sciences articles has not decreased over time in Brazil and Portugal.”
  • “The Replication Crisis and the Basic Science Problem.”
  • “Is famous Princeton historian on Twitter, Kevin Kruse, a plagiarist? »
  • “IHU: ANSM imposes severe sanctions on Didier Raoult’s institute.
  • “Disgraced trachea surgeon sentenced in Sweden for harming a patient.”
  • “Fill in the empty tracks for more quotes.” And a follow-up.
  • A study retracted after “a report by the PRIMeR group at the University of Sydney (Australia) led by Professor Jennifer Byrne”.
  • “This article was withdrawn at the request of the authors due to misidentification of the scale used as the Wong-Baker FACES Pain Scale, when in fact it is the universal pain assessment tool which was used.”
  • “Let’s end the uneasy marriage between universities and commercial publishers.”
  • “Why doesn’t academia let go of ‘publish or perish’”?
  • “Professor at the Univ. from Japan. of Fukui accused of fake peer review program.
  • “Peer Reviewer Duels.”
  • “Reports from junior examiners, women and examiners from Western Europe are generally more developmentally conducive than those from seniors, men and examiners working at academic institutions outside Western regions.”
  • “The peer review system, which relies on unpaid volunteers, has long been promoted. COVID-19 makes the situation worse, much worse. »
  • “If you see something, say something, because it happens” [science integrity sleuth Elisabeth] Bik warned.
  • “Reputable Journal Rejects Papers That Exclude African Scholars.”
  • Should a 1979 article on “conversion therapy” be retracted?
  • The New York Academy of Medicine disavows a 1964 report on homosexuality.
  • “Data Irregularities Surface for Study of MicroRNAs in Autism.”
  • “Retracted Paper Shines a Light on Chemistry’s History of Trying to Avoid the Expensive, Toxic – But Necessary Catalyst.” Our cover from last year.
  • “The Sydney Morning Herald Retracts Rebel Wilson’s Article Following Backlash Claiming the Publication Plans to ‘Pull It Out’.”
  • “Unfortunately, retraction seems to be a common enough outcome for a scientific paper that we as a research community need to take more seriously…”
  • NYU administrators have “approved the termination for cause of Chuanshu Huang, MD, PhD, a tenured faculty member” for failing “to disclose that he acted as principal investigator and [co-PI] on external research activities” on behalf of a university in China.
  • “Is there an epidemic of research fraud in natural medicine? And more comments.
  • Retraction watch continues to be a valuable resource on retracted journal articles and hijacked reviews.

Like the retraction watch? You can do a tax-deductible contribution to support our workFollow us on Twitterlike us on Facebookadd us to your RSS readeror subscribe to our daily summary. If you find a retraction that is not in our databaseyou can let us know here. For feedback or feedback, email us at team@retractionwatch.com.

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For deeply divided families, a summer of burning buttons begins – The Journal https://nalburiyedergisi.com/for-deeply-divided-families-a-summer-of-burning-buttons-begins-the-journal/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 07:24:44 +0000 https://nalburiyedergisi.com/for-deeply-divided-families-a-summer-of-burning-buttons-begins-the-journal/ For families divided along the Red House-Blue House lines, the slate of summer reunions, group trips and weddings lays another grueling round of navigation divisions. NEW YORK (AP) — Kristia Leyendecker has navigated a range of opposing views from her two siblings and others close to her since 2016, when Donald Trump’s election brought a […]]]>

For families divided along the Red House-Blue House lines, the slate of summer reunions, group trips and weddings lays another grueling round of navigation divisions.

NEW YORK (AP) — Kristia Leyendecker has navigated a range of opposing views from her two siblings and others close to her since 2016, when Donald Trump’s election brought a sharp and painful point to their political divisions as she walked away from today’s Republican Party and they didn’t.

Then came the pandemic, the chaotic 2020 election, and more disputes over masks and vaccinations. Still, she hung on to keep the relationships intact. Everything changed in February 2021 during the devastating freeze in the Dallas area where they all live, she with her husband and two of their three children. Leyendecker’s middle child began a gender transition, and Leyendecker’s brother, wife, and sister cut off contact with his family. Their mother was caught in the middle.

“I was devastated. If you had told me 10 years ago, even five years ago, that I would now be separated from my family, I would have told you that you were lying. We were a very close family. We We did all the holidays together. I went through all the stages of grief several times,” says Leyendecker, 49, a secondary school teacher.

Since then, there have been no more family picnics or group vacations. There were no mass gatherings for Thanksgiving and Christmas. As summer approaches, nothing has changed.

For families fractured along house red-house blue lines, the summer slate of reunions, travels and weddings poses another grueling set of tensions at a time of great fatigue. Pandemic restrictions are gone, but gun control, the fight for reproductive rights, hearings on the January 6 insurrection, which are to blame for soaring inflation and a host of other issues continue to simmer.

Sarah Stewart Holland and Beth Silvers, co-hosts of the popular Pantsuit Politics podcast, hosted small group conversations with listeners about family, friendships, church, community, work and partners as they launched their second book, “Now What? » How to move forward when we are divided (on practically everything).

What they heard is relatively consistent.

“Everyone is still really hurt by some of the COVID fallout from their relationships,” says Stewart Holland. “People are still heartbroken over certain friendships that have crumbled, partnerships that are now strained, family relationships that have grown apart. As people begin to come together again, this pain is on the surface, about the last fight or the last disagreement or the last outburst.

She called this moment in a still highly polarized nation a “political conflict bingo card for some families right now.”

Reda Hicks, 41, was born and raised in Odessa, the epicenter of West Texas’ oil industry. His family is large, conservative and deeply evangelical. She is the oldest of four siblings and the oldest of 24 first cousins. His move to Austin for college was a revelation. Even more important was his move to ultra-progressive Berkeley, Calif., for law school.

She’s been in Houston since 2005 and has seen the friction between friends and family from her two very different worlds grow on her social media feeds, emboldened by the distance the internet offers.

“There has been a horrible caricature at both ends of this spectrum. Like, “I’m going to talk to you like you’re the caricature of a hippie in my head” or “I’m going to talk to you like you’re the caricature in my head of a thug”, which means you’re a stupid anyway and you have no idea what you’re talking about,” says Hicks, a business consultant and mother of two young children.

“Everything feels so personal now.”

Immigration and Border Security appear regularly. The same goes for abortion and access to health care for women. Religion, especially the separation of church and state, is a third hot spot. And there is gun reform in light of the recent mass shooting at a school in Uvalde, Texas and other massacres. She has relatives – including her retired military and conservative husband – who own and carry guns.

In life offline, Hicks’ family interactions can be strained but remain civil, with regular get-togethers that include a recent group weekend at his second home in the East Texas Pineywoods.

She never considered a transition to no contact with conservative loved ones. With a brother living just across the street, that would be hard to achieve. As a couple, Hicks and her husband made a conscious decision to openly discuss their opposing views in the presence of their children, ages 11 and 5.

It’s a kind of humility, allowing them to agree to disagree. “And we disagree a lot. But our ground rules are undeniable. If something gets too hot, we take a time out.”

No real ground rules are set when it comes to the rest of their families, other than changing the subject when things seem to be heading for an overflow.

Daryl Van Tongeren, associate professor of psychology at Hope College in Holland, Michigan, has just released a new book on the quiet power of restraint, “Humble: Free Yourself from the Traps of a Narcissistic World.” In his eyes, the Hicks are right, although cultural humility is a big ask for some divided families.

“Cultural humility is when we realize that our cultural perspective is not superior and we demonstrate curiosity to learn from others, seeing the multitude of diverse approaches as a strength,” says Van Tongeren. “This humility does not come at the expense of fighting for the oppressed, nor does it require people to be reluctant to stand up for their personal values. But the way we engage with the people we are not with agreement is important.”

Van Tongeren is an optimist. “Humility,” he says, “has the potential to change our relationships, our communities and our nations. It helps to bridge the divisions and center the humanity in each of us. And that’s what we desperately need right now.”

In the camp of humility, he is not alone. Thomas Plante, who teaches psychology at Santa Clara University in California, a liberal Jesuit school, recommends the same.

“Having a lively conversation at a picnic or barbecue won’t change your mind. Typically, it just creates tension and hurts feelings,” Plante says.

Carla Bevins, assistant professor of communication at Carnegie Mellon’s Tepper School of Business, focuses on interpersonal communication, etiquette and conflict management. Emotional reserve sinks fell even lower at the onset of near summer, she says, compared to the stressful family times of, say, Thanksgiving and Christmas.

“We are so tired,” she said. “And so often we formulate our own response before we even really hear what the other person is trying to say. It must be a question of finding this common point. Ask yourself how much energy do I have in a day? And remember, there’s always the option of not going.

___

Follow Associated Press reporter Leanne Italy on Twitter at http://twitter.com/italy

A woman holds a sign saying “Stop Abortion Now,” during a protest outside the U.S. Supreme Court in Washington on May 5, 2022, left, and another woman holds a sign during a conference of reproductive rights press in response to leaked draft of Supreme Court opinion to overturn Roe v. Wade, in West Hollywood, Calif., on March 3, 2022. For families divided along red-blue house lines, the summer’s list of reunions, group trips and weddings poses another grueling round of navigate the divisions. The season opens at a time of conflict fatigue. Pandemic restrictions are gone, but gun control, the fight for reproductive rights, January 6 insurrection hearings, the bite of high inflation and a host of other issues prevail. (AP Photo)

FILE – Reggie Daniels pays his respects at a memorial at Robb Elementary School in Uvalde, Texas, June 9, 2022, honoring the two teachers and 19 students killed in the May 24 school shooting. For families fractured along the red house-blue house lines, the slate of summer reunions and weddings pose another cycle of tension. Pandemic restrictions are gone, but gun control, the fight for reproductive rights, hearings on the January 6 insurrection, which are to blame for soaring inflation and a host of other issues continue to simmer. (AP Photo/Eric Gay, File)

Actor Matthew McConaughey holds an image of 10-year-old Alithia Ramirez, who was killed in the mass shooting at an elementary school in Uvalde, Texas, during a press briefing at the White House on June 7, 2022, in Washington, left, a woman holds a sign during a Students Demand Action event in Washington on June 6, 2022, center, and Rep. Lauren Boebert, R-Colo., a member of the House Second Amendment caucus, speaks about Democratic measures to address gun violence in Washington, June February 8, 2022, after mass shootings in Uvalde, Texas, and Buffalo, NY (AP Photo)

Former President Donald Trump speaks during a campaign rally in Greensburg, Pennsylvania on May 6, 2022, left, an American flag flies below the U.S. Capitol dome on Capitol Hill in Washington on June 9, 2022, center , and Vice Chair Liz Cheney, R-Wyo., of the House Select Committee investigating the Jan. 6 U.S. Capitol uprising, speaks before the House Rules Committee seeking contempt of Congress charges against Trump advisers Peter Navarro and Dan Scavino at the Washington Capitol on April 4. 2022. (AP Photo)

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Lillian (Lil) Marie Van Straten (Juntunen) | News, Sports, Jobs https://nalburiyedergisi.com/lillian-lil-marie-van-straten-juntunen-news-sports-jobs/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 07:05:04 +0000 https://nalburiyedergisi.com/lillian-lil-marie-van-straten-juntunen-news-sports-jobs/ BARAGA, MI – 94 year old Lillian (Lil) Marie Van Straten (Juntunen) of Baraga, MI died Monday, June 6, 2022 at Baraga County Memorial Hospital. Lil was born on December 27, 1927 in Nisula, MI, the daughter of Arthur and Armita (Lepisto) Juntunen. Lil graduated from Baraga High School in 1946. She married her high […]]]>

BARAGA, MI – 94 year old Lillian (Lil) Marie Van Straten (Juntunen) of Baraga, MI died Monday, June 6, 2022 at Baraga County Memorial Hospital.

Lil was born on December 27, 1927 in Nisula, MI, the daughter of Arthur and Armita (Lepisto) Juntunen. Lil graduated from Baraga High School in 1946. She married her high school sweetheart, George Peter Van Straten, on February 26, 1949, in Baraga.

In addition to starting a family together, they founded Van Straten Manufacturing, which is now owned by the 3rd generation.

In 1980, Lil and Pete purchased the historic mill and deep water harbor previously owned by the Ford Motor Company in Pequaming, MI. With their ambitious vision and determination, they restored the property and built a marina that they owned, operated and shared with boaters. and tourists over the past 41 years.

Lil made the world a better place with his huge heart, generosity and love for all.

Lil was immensely proud of her family. Her grandchildren cherish their memories of all their good times with “Nana”. Whether it’s playing the piano, cooking, picking berries, their frequent sleepovers and of course shopping. She was admired for her exquisite sense of style.

Lil was a member of the Sacred Heart of Jesus Catholic Church in L’Anse, the Red Hats Society and the Aura Hospital Auxiliary. She has been a generous donor to various organizations. Her family is very comforted to know that they are with our Lord.

Lil is pursued in death by her parents, her brothers, James, Norman, Arnold and Raymond Juntunen; sisters, Mae Loman and Jean Clisch; sons, Baby George and Michael Van Straten.

She is survived by her husband, Pete Van Straten of Baraga, a loving husband of 73 years; brother, Harold Juntunen of Livonia, MI; daughters, Mary (Bill) Mowry of Lake Forest, IL, Sue Van Straten of Chicago, IL; sons, Peter (Diane) Van Straten of Baraga, George (Jill) Van Straten of Chassell; daughter-in-law, Donna Van Straten of Negaunee; grandchildren, Peter (Susanah) Landry, Darragh (Arthur) Blachno, Rachel (Colin) Schiewe, Hannah Mowry, Chris (Amber) Van Straten, Carmen (Tyler) Larson, Jenna Van Straten, Eric (Autumn) Van Straten, Josh (Caitlin) Van Straten, Taylor Swanson, Catherine Van Straten, Matt (Emily) Carstens, Laura Carstens, Ashley (Luke) Cody; great-grandchildren, Christian, Colton, Jaycee, Georgia, Tessa, Rylan, Rosalie, Tanner, Breigh, Nari, Daewon, Charlotte, Phoebe, Auggie, Sam, Scarlet, Michael and Melanie; sisters-in-law, Jen Juntunen of Farmington Hills, MI and Jane Juntunen of Greenland, MI.

Visitations will be held at the Sacred Heart of Jesus Church in L’Anse on Tuesday, June 14, from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m. His funeral will take place at 1 p.m. with Fr. Referee Corey Litzner. Lunch will follow in the parish hall. Burial will take place in the Baraga Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Sacred Heart School in L’Anse. Jacobson Funeral Home is helping the family.

Friends can sign Lillian’s guestbook or send condolences to www.jacobsonfuneralhome.com.

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The 1893 Land Tax Register takes a circuitous route home https://nalburiyedergisi.com/the-1893-land-tax-register-takes-a-circuitous-route-home/ Sun, 12 Jun 2022 14:28:34 +0000 https://nalburiyedergisi.com/the-1893-land-tax-register-takes-a-circuitous-route-home/ GREENEVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Forgotten chapters of Greene County history are gathering dust in attics and basements. The T. Elmer Cox Genealogical and Historical Library looks forward to recovering and preserving records and other documents so that the information is available for future generations. Christopher Gose, deputy director of the Greeneville/Greene County Public Library and […]]]>

GREENEVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Forgotten chapters of Greene County history are gathering dust in attics and basements.

The T. Elmer Cox Genealogical and Historical Library looks forward to recovering and preserving records and other documents so that the information is available for future generations.

Christopher Gose, deputy director of the Greeneville/Greene County Public Library and the Cox Library, hopes a recent example of a citizen presenting “a significant donation” will inspire others to do the same.

An 1893 Greene County tax record was recently donated to the Cox Library, which is a repository for all things county history.


Gose and the donor discussed the winding journey of the tax registry.

Gose was working one day at the Cox Library at 229 N. Main St., when John Haynes stopped by.

Haynes, who operates the Davy Crockett Trading Co. antique store on East Andrew Johnson Highway in Limestone with his son Nicholas, brought the tax register with him. The book contains names, addresses, property square footage, and tax amounts assessed to those listed, ordered by the 25 electoral districts of Greene County in 1893.

The information offers valuable insight into Greene County from 129 years ago.

“It’s a fascinating book. It shows who owns the property, but it also shows who owns the adjacent properties,” Gose said.

Haynes said he and his son Nicholas went to an estate sale in March in Hendersonville, North Carolina. The tax register was among the items for sale.

“We knew he had to come home, so we bought him,” he said last week.

The Haynese paid $250 for the well-preserved volume.

“We’re not rich or anything. We thought it was to give back to the history of the county. The love of history is why my son and I had an interest in getting into antiques,” said John Haynes. “We thought it would be helpful for people doing family history.”

The tax records book came with a bonus. Inside was a flyer advertising a December 1975 antique show in Kingsport, sponsored by the East Tennessee Antique Dealers Association. This gave Haynes a clue as to where the buyer acquired it.

How the book appeared at a Kingsport antiques fair nearly 47 years ago is a matter of speculation.

“I have a theory about it,” Haynes said. “The Greene County Courthouse was remodeled and remodeled in the 1970s. I believe it was thrown away or donated. I really think they didn’t realize the importance of (historical) information at that time.

Haynes and his son “knew it was important and needed to be brought home.”

Gose was pleasantly surprised when he saw what Hayneses brought to the library.

“When I picked up the book, it was great to see the excitement when he saw the book. It was pretty cool,” Haynes said. “He just seemed thrilled.”

Gose opened and carefully turned the pages of the tax records book one day last week.

“It helps with the genealogy, who owned the land and who it was passed down to,” Gose said. “It would have been stored at the courthouse.”

The scope of the book quickly becomes apparent. June Pinkston, who has worked at the Cox Library for nearly 20 years, opened it up to a section detailing landowners in the 21st District, a northern section of Greene County. Her finger slid down the page and stopped on a line with a handwritten name and other notations in the columns to the right.

“Jacob Fleming Morisson. He’s my great-grandfather,” Pinkston said.

“The 21st arrondissement is where he lived. Cross anchor. The property is where North Greene High School is located today,” Pinkston said.

Pinkston lives on land formerly farmed by Morrison, who owned plots of 60 acres and 12 acres. The 60-acre parcel was valued at $260 in 1893, “not quite $5 an acre,” Pinkston said.

Taxes imposed on each landowner include poll tax, state tax, county tax, school tax, road tax, and “poor tax”.

Morrison’s property tax bill for 1893 was $1.38.

“Money was terribly scarce back then,” Pinkston said.

Neighbors who owned adjoining land include another family named Morrison, as well as the Kendry and Hawkins families.

“It’s the most detailed list I’ve ever seen. I was just excited to see it,” Pinkston said.

Gose is grateful that Haynes chose to donate the book to the library. He said its content far outweighed its monetary value.

“It’s invaluable to us,” Gose said. “He should be back in Greene County. That’s how he told us.”

Although the courthouse was remodeled in the 1970s, “from our city and county government perspective, it’s highly unlikely that it was tossed out,” Gose said.

Gose referenced a Tennessee law known as the “Replevin Law,” which prohibits the removal of any records created by the state, county, or municipal government from the agency’s custody.

On occasion in the past, Gose said people looking for family documents such as wills or marriage licenses would be allowed to access stored documents. Relevant pages would be torn from a book, or an entire volume would be removed from the courthouse.

The full story of the journey the 1893 tax record traveled will likely never be known, but Gose hopes the generosity of the Haynes family will inspire Greene County residents to look at what they have stored in secluded places and consider making similar donations to the library.

There is no criminal or civil liability.

“We give the possibility to return it to its rightful owner. I’m sure there are others that people have,” Gose said.

Greene County still has a wealth of historical records and documents dating back over 200 years that are safely stored. Gose worked with Circuit Court Clerk Chris Shepard for several years to help protect them.

“Our job will ultimately be to clean up each page, digitize it and preserve it,” Gose said. “It’s our mission at the Cox to preserve these things for Greene County.”

He said artifacts like the 1893 tax records book help bring a bygone era to life.

“It’s Greeneville. It’s tangible history,” Gose said. “It’s about preserving and making sure these records are preserved for generations to come.”

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Book Review of Under the Skin: The Hidden Toll of Racism on American Lives and on the Health of our Nation by Linda Villarosa https://nalburiyedergisi.com/book-review-of-under-the-skin-the-hidden-toll-of-racism-on-american-lives-and-on-the-health-of-our-nation-by-linda-villarosa/ Fri, 10 Jun 2022 15:00:00 +0000 https://nalburiyedergisi.com/book-review-of-under-the-skin-the-hidden-toll-of-racism-on-american-lives-and-on-the-health-of-our-nation-by-linda-villarosa/ Placeholder while loading article actions My wife was 20 weeks pregnant when she had a spurt of pink fluid and we felt our first child was not moving inside her. A panicked call to 911 brought paramedics. While examining my wife, the paramedics had a casual conversation with us about our work as graduate students […]]]>
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My wife was 20 weeks pregnant when she had a spurt of pink fluid and we felt our first child was not moving inside her. A panicked call to 911 brought paramedics. While examining my wife, the paramedics had a casual conversation with us about our work as graduate students at the University of Iowa. The tenor sounded strange at the time, but he offered hope; the paramedics would surely not speak if our child was in trouble.

Once the review was over, we had even more hope; we were advised to go to the hospital “for observation”, but no need to rush. An hour later we drove ourselves and learned, contrary to what the paramedics were suggesting, that our child had died. We were told to go home and ‘let nature take its course’ – meaning my wife was to deliver our lifeless child home in a bucket we had been given.

Two days later, my wife went into labor. When she had a fever and chills, I called our doctor; he told me to give him an aspirin. But she got worse. I called the paramedics. I was terrified that along with our child, I would lose my wife, who was now in our tub, unconscious and bleeding, alongside “the death” she had delivered. She was rushed to hospital for emergency surgery in an attempt to save her life.

Thank God my wife survived, but 30 years later, she and I remain haunted by our experience and the belief that race played a role in this story. If we had been white, like all the medical personnel who treated us, rather than black, perhaps the first paramedics would have equalized us. And maybe in the hospital we would have had the option of surgical evacuation instead of being sent home to suffer a risky fetal death in the second trimester. According to the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the University of California, Davis, a fetal death delivered at home during the second trimester is at high risk for significant bleeding. When we told hospital staff that we had strong apprehensions about seeing and handling our child’s remains at home in the grip of our grief, maybe – if we had been a white couple – we would not have received the insensitive and false answer: “There ‘ll be nothing to do with the disappearance, other than the gray matter. And when I called our doctor when my wife had chills and a high fever during her delivery, I might have been asked to take her to the hospital immediately.

In a searing 2018 New York Times Magazine article titled “Why America’s Black Moms and Babies Are in a Life-and-Death Crisis,” Linda Villarosa wrote, “People of color, especially people black, are treated differently when they enter. the health system. Race, in other words, in terms of health care in this country, is the story. Villarosa, a journalism professor at the City University of New York, reported on studies that show, for example, that black people are less likely than white people to receive kidney dialysis or transplants, coronary bypass surgery, heart medications appropriate or painkillers, but they are more frequent amputations for diabetes.

In her brilliant and illuminating book, “Under the Skin: The Hidden Toll of Racism on American Lives and on the Health of Our Nation,” Villarosa expands on the theme. She discovers that racial bias within the healthcare system is an aggravating factor in racial bias in America. Meticulously researched, sweeping in its historical breadth, damning in its lucid assessment of the facts and yet hopeful in its outlook, “Under the Skin” is a must read for anyone who argues that black lives matter. It will be especially telling for anyone who believes that wealth, education, and access to quality medical services are the great equalizers, the feasible means by which black Americans can achieve health care parity.

Equal treatment within the health care system, argues Villarosa, regardless of class or social status, remains elusive due to three main obstacles: long-standing institutional and structural discrimination; the implicit biases of the medical profession resulting not only in misdiagnosis but even blame for being sick; and “aging,” which, Villarosa writes, refers to the “struggle with anger and grief sparked by daily racial slurs and microaggressions… [which] can, over time, damage body systems.

The female reproductive system is not immune. Villarosa cites a 2007 study from the American Journal of Public Health which shows that black women who reported experiencing racial discrimination had two to three times more low birth weight babies than black women who did not. did not report incidents of discrimination. In summary, Villarosa writes, “The researchers’ conclusion: low birth weight among African American women has more to do with the experience of racism than with race.

A decade earlier, Villarosa rigorously followed all prescribed prenatal care during her own pregnancy, but had to wonder if her “lived experience as a black woman in America” ​​had left her daughter at just 4 pounds, 13 ounces. She says a doctor “harassed” her with questions about her lifestyle, as if she were a habitual user of alcohol and drugs. Villarosa wondered, “Does this doctor think I’m sucking a crack pipe the second I leave the office?”

To combat racism in health care, Villarosa advocates for implicit bias training for medical personnel and champions expanding the diversity of students, faculty, and curricula in colleges of medicine. medicine.

However, racism cannot be fought if its existence is denied. Signs of its persistence were apparent in comments made by the associate editor of the prestigious Journal of the American Medical Association in a Podcast 2021. “Structural racism in an unfortunate term,” said this editor. “Personally, I think taking racism out of the conversation will help. Many people like me are offended by the implication that we are somehow racist. JAMA’s Twitter account tweeted about the podcast: “No doctor is racist, so how can there be structural racism in healthcare?” The podcast and tweet were deleted and, Villarosa writes, “the associate editor and editor – both Caucasian doctors – have resigned.”

Some people are offended by what the extensive research shows about health care disparities. Villarosa provides the facts galore, perhaps none more alarming than this: Black women, including those “whose income and education should protect them”, are three to four times more likely than white women from dying of pregnancy-related causes.

Tennis star Serena Williams was almost one of those victims. The day after her daughter’s delivery by caesarean section section, Williams had difficulty breathing and knew from experience that she was suffering from a pulmonary embolism. She told the medical staff what was happening and the treatment she needed, but she was ignored. Her persistent cough eventually broke her C-section sutures, sending her back to surgery; it was then that a large hematoma was discovered in his abdomen, which required further surgery. Villanova documents a number of equally harrowing stories, if the facts alone weren’t enough to convince us of the current crisis.

But some don’t need convincing. Alas, we have our own stories.

Jerald Walker is Professor of African American Literature and Creative Writing at Emerson College. His latest book,How to Make a Slave and Other Trialswas a nonfiction finalist for the 2020 National Book Award.

The Hidden Toll of Racism on American Lives and the Health of Our Nation

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