Journal Publication – Nalburiye Dergisi http://nalburiyedergisi.com/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 17:42:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://nalburiyedergisi.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-1.png Journal Publication – Nalburiye Dergisi http://nalburiyedergisi.com/ 32 32 OSU University Day speaker gives direct assessment of areas where science and higher education need to do better http://nalburiyedergisi.com/osu-university-day-speaker-gives-direct-assessment-of-areas-where-science-and-higher-education-need-to-do-better/ Wed, 15 Sep 2021 16:59:07 +0000 http://nalburiyedergisi.com/osu-university-day-speaker-gives-direct-assessment-of-areas-where-science-and-higher-education-need-to-do-better/ CORVALLIS, Ore. – Editor-in-chief of science journal Holden Thorp on Tuesday presented an unvarnished view of the challenges facing higher education and the scientific community, especially in light of the pandemic, during a keynote address at Oregon State University. Thorp spoke to University day, OSU’s annual launch of the new academic year for faculty and […]]]>

CORVALLIS, Ore. – Editor-in-chief of science journal Holden Thorp on Tuesday presented an unvarnished view of the challenges facing higher education and the scientific community, especially in light of the pandemic, during a keynote address at Oregon State University.

Thorp spoke to University day, OSU’s annual launch of the new academic year for faculty and staff. Nearly 1,000 people viewed the virtual event which was held remotely due to COVID-19 and included the announcement of awards given to OSU faculty and staff for teaching, research, exemplary leadership and service over the past year.

Thorp explained how the interaction between scientists, politicians, and the public is linked to current misinformation, scientific illiteracy, political interference, and systemic racism, which he says contributes to mistrust of the science and dissatisfaction with higher education institutions.

As the editor of the Science family of journals, a former research chemist, former chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and former rector of the University of Washington, Thorp has been able to sympathize with researchers and scholars. university administrators.

“Universities are increasingly difficult to manage,” he said. “The pandemic has made things more difficult, mainly because we have a huge disconnect between what people expect from higher education outside and what higher education is able to do and wants to do at home. interior. “

Rather than seeking knowledge for the sake of clarification, Thorp said outside stakeholders often demand that universities produce tangible results and applied research, especially to advance the fields of medicine and military defense. .

The expectation of focusing narrowly on high-level applied sciences also leads science undergraduates to miss out on a more holistic education, Thorp said. This means that many scientists lack the liberal arts or humanities skills needed to effectively communicate their science to the public.

“You hear academics say, ‘Well, science communication isn’t the same as rigorous scientific research.’ But these are very important efforts and we should celebrate and encourage our students and colleagues who are ready to do it (communication), ”he said. “Let’s face it, a lot of us who are good at research are terrible at this.”

Following Thorp’s presentation, Selina Heppell, OSU Faculty Senate President and Head of the Fisheries and Wildlife Department, and distinguished professor of microbiology Rebecca Vega-Thurber participated in a panel discussion with Thorp.

Heppell pointed out that the importance of science communication has been highlighted by the pandemic, as the public has witnessed the ‘science mess’ in real time, with emerging data disproving old assumptions and prompting new ones. recommendations. Vega-Thurber said some of the current hesitation and resistance to vaccines is rooted in the history of colonialism in Western science and in the racist practices of some doctors and scientists.

Thorp listed several warnings and findings scientists have made over the past 18 months that have not been heeded by the public: The pandemic will last for years; the virus will evolve; masks work; vaccines protect against serious illness, not infection; asymptomatic transmission occurs; and racism can be measured and quantified.

He said the fact that the public has largely refused to accept these means means that scientists have to ask themselves where they have failed to get their message across and what they can do differently in the future.

“It’s a challenge because we want people to buy our whole story at the same time, and we’re not going to get them that way,” he said. “We need to understand how we thwart social media and cable news numbers that aren’t constrained by the constraints we have. … Somehow we have to figure out how to sell this in a more nuanced way.

Thorp also answered questions from the public on accessibility issues of scientific publications, both for readers and for scientists wishing to publish; how Science as a journal strives to make its community more inclusive; and the importance of recognizing racism and other systemic biases in the review and publication processes of scientific journals.

“We have to have the courage to be prepared to face a lot of racism, sexism and homophobia that has been part of science for all this time,” he said. “There are a lot of people who still don’t want to face this, but we’re doing everything we can to have conversations about these topics. “

The Zoom recording of the opening speech is available on the University day website.


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TikTok reportedly released explicit sex and drug videos to 13-year-olds http://nalburiyedergisi.com/tiktok-reportedly-released-explicit-sex-and-drug-videos-to-13-year-olds/ Wed, 08 Sep 2021 15:28:46 +0000 http://nalburiyedergisi.com/tiktok-reportedly-released-explicit-sex-and-drug-videos-to-13-year-olds/ TikTok reportedly recommended explicit drugs and sex videos to its younger users. A Wall Street Journal survey found hundreds of adult videos on For You pages for users ages 13 to 15. A spokesperson for TikTok said the app doesn’t differentiate between the videos it recommends for adults and minors. Loading Something is loading. TikTok […]]]>
  • TikTok reportedly recommended explicit drugs and sex videos to its younger users.
  • A Wall Street Journal survey found hundreds of adult videos on For You pages for users ages 13 to 15.
  • A spokesperson for TikTok said the app doesn’t differentiate between the videos it recommends for adults and minors.

TikTok distributes drug-related and sexually explicit content to minors, a recent Wall Street Journal investigation found.

Using dozens of automated bots registered as users between the ages of 13 and 15, the post revealed that TikTok provides accounts with dozens of videos promoting rape, drugs and sexual fantasies, including some representing caregivers and children.

Teens make up TikTok’s largest group around 100 million monthly active users. Last year, minors made up more than a quarter of app users, according to company data.

An earlier Journal investigation found that TikTok organizes a user’s For You page based on the content a user lingers on in their feed. Using the same methodology, bots that focused on drug content quickly saw their For You page invaded by nearly 600 videos featuring drug-related content. The Journal said the page contained a rabbit hole of content advertising how to get drugs, as well as external links to web pages selling illegal substances.

Likewise, bots that lingered on more sexual content were bombarded with videos about sexual power dynamics and violence, as well as links to external pages for porn like OnlyFans. that 90% of his videos are about sex and bondage. Many sexually explicit videos had tags indicating they were meant to be ‘adults only’.

Certain content encountered by Le Journal is prohibited by the platform by TikTok Community Guidelines. The post said hundreds of videos were removed from the platform before they could be shared with TikTok, but it shared 974 examples of explicit content with the company.

A spokesperson for TikTok did not respond to a request for comment from Insider in time for publication, but told the Journal that the company declined to comment on individual video content. The spokesperson said the majority of the videos did not violate TikTok policies. However, the company told the Journal that it removed some of the videos after the post alerted the company and restricted the distribution of some of the other videos.

The spokesperson also said that the app does not differentiate between the videos it serves to adults and minors. However, the platform is looking to create a tool that filters content for younger users.

In July, an Insider investigation found that TikTok’s algorithm automatically suggested content about eating disorders that appeared to violate TikTok’s community guidelines. The Journal’s robots have also developed content promoting eating disorders, as well as drunk driving.

Read the full Wall Street Journal survey here.


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Sahan Journal focuses on the experience of immigrants in Minnesota – Twin Cities http://nalburiyedergisi.com/sahan-journal-focuses-on-the-experience-of-immigrants-in-minnesota-twin-cities/ Sat, 04 Sep 2021 11:25:16 +0000 http://nalburiyedergisi.com/sahan-journal-focuses-on-the-experience-of-immigrants-in-minnesota-twin-cities/ “Sahan,” said Sahan Journal founder Mukhtar Ibrahim, is a “beautiful Somali word meaning“ pioneer ”. : “The most trusted figures in the community testing and coming back with reliable information. “ The Sahan Journal is a Minnesota media focused on immigrant communities and communities of color. When Ibrahim launched the Sahan Journal in 2019, he […]]]>

“Sahan,” said Sahan Journal founder Mukhtar Ibrahim, is a “beautiful Somali word meaning“ pioneer ”. : “The most trusted figures in the community testing and coming back with reliable information. “

The Sahan Journal is a Minnesota media focused on immigrant communities and communities of color. When Ibrahim launched the Sahan Journal in 2019, he became a pioneer himself, venturing into the uncharted lands of creating a publication from scratch.

Muhktar Ibrahim (TreeSixty Journalism / Evan Frost)

“The first six months I was like, ‘What am I doing?’ “

A former Star Tribune and Minnesota Public Radio reporter, Ibrahim emailed ideas for stories about immigrant communities and communities of color to an editor, which were not used. He would open the journal and find no stories he could relate to.

“You doubt you’re there in this newsroom that doesn’t really value stories about your community,” he said. “So either you put your head down, do your job, meet the deadlines and come home disappointed, or you take the risk and do something that will meet the need.”

Celebrating the newspaper’s two-year anniversary, Ibrahim now has a better idea of ​​what he’s doing and says the risk has paid off. He leads a full-time team of 10 people.

Race quotas, insufficient staff diversity, and article restrictions that hamper mainstream newsrooms are no longer a problem for Ibrahim in the Sahan Journal newsroom. “We’re not saying, ‘We had this community yesterday. We don’t have to cover it today, ”Ibrahim said. “People keep dreaming big and writing all the stories they want to pursue.”

The stories are linked. Readers see stories relevant to their lives, and in return, they call and submit ideas for more. “They see their communities are valued,” Ibrahim said.

Ibrahim said the Sahan Journal sets the agenda by showing “that there are stories besides tragedies and breaking news” about people of color that can be shared.

From sharing successes to exposing injustices, the Sahan Journal is rooted in providing trusted services to its communities. In 2020, a new responsibility emerged: ensuring the safety of the community.

COVID-19 has hit communities of color hard, and from the early stages of the pandemic, Ibrahim and his team got to work issuing the COVID-19 guidelines in languages ​​like Hmong and Somali.

The essential was the minimum for Ibrahim. He wanted to take a “holistic approach” that showed the full impact of COVID-19 on communities, whether tragic or inspiring. For example, in partnership with the University of Minnesota Journalism Program, Sahan Journal published a series of obituaries for people of color and immigrants.

“The coronavirus has killed a lot of people in our communities,” Ibrahim said.

The Sahan Journal also published articles on community members helping with health care. As vaccinations rolled out, Sahan Journal launched a series of Immunization FAQs featuring trusted community leaders. The staff wanted to “give the community the microphone and let them tackle issues with their own voice,” Ibrahim said.

COVID-19 continues to shape the newsroom, revealing inequalities in health systems, housing, insurance and education. Ibrahim plans to expand Sahan Journal’s coverage across Minnesota to represent more communities. Ibrahim will continue to build on his vision of becoming a Sahan for communities in Minnesota.

He also encourages others to follow his example and break away from the mainstream media.

“If you’re a person of color in the newsroom, you face a lot of challenges and there’s nothing you can do about it because you’re in the system. So, as soon as you step out of the system, you can dream big and pursue things that are important to you. “


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Efficacy of the Covid-19 vaccine: what do the numbers really mean? http://nalburiyedergisi.com/efficacy-of-the-covid-19-vaccine-what-do-the-numbers-really-mean/ Sat, 28 Aug 2021 12:51:00 +0000 http://nalburiyedergisi.com/efficacy-of-the-covid-19-vaccine-what-do-the-numbers-really-mean/ The spread of the Delta variant, an increase in the number of people vaccinated testing positive for Covid-19, and the U.S. government’s call for booster shots have raised new questions about the potency of coronavirus vaccines. Here’s what we know about the performance of licensed variant vaccines and their ability to prevent serious infections and […]]]>

The spread of the Delta variant, an increase in the number of people vaccinated testing positive for Covid-19, and the U.S. government’s call for booster shots have raised new questions about the potency of coronavirus vaccines. Here’s what we know about the performance of licensed variant vaccines and their ability to prevent serious infections and illnesses.

What does it mean to say that a vaccine is effective?

Health experts and scientists use a variety of terms and measures to describe the effectiveness of a vaccine. Vaccines can be evaluated for their ability to prevent initial infection, symptomatic illness, or serious illness that can lead to hospitalization or death.

When researchers use the term efficacy, they are describing how a vaccine works under ideal, tightly controlled conditions such as clinical trials. Efficacy refers to how the vaccine works in the real world, when people lead normal lives. without the same controls in place.

Vaccines authorized in the United States have shown protection against symptomatic Covid-19 in clinical trials. The researchers investigated whether the vaccines prevented people from both tested positive for Covid-19 and showing at least one symptom. The studies did not measure whether the vaccines protect against asymptomatic infection, which simply means a positive test for Covid-19.

For example, in large, late-stage clinical trials conducted by vaccine manufacturers, the vaccine from Pfizer Inc. and its partner BioNTech SE last year was found to be 95% effective in preventing symptoms of Covid-19, while the Moderna Inc. vaccine was 94.1% effective. In the study of about 44,000 people on the Pfizer vaccine, 170 developed Covid-19 with at least one symptom. Of these, only eight had been vaccinated, while 162 had received a placebo. The 95% efficiency rate is derived from this report.


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WHO Covid database contains many ‘questionable journals’, 70 articles are written by Indians http://nalburiyedergisi.com/who-covid-database-contains-many-questionable-journals-70-articles-are-written-by-indians/ Wed, 25 Aug 2021 05:35:27 +0000 http://nalburiyedergisi.com/who-covid-database-contains-many-questionable-journals-70-articles-are-written-by-indians/ The headquarters of the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland | Photo: Pierre Virot | www.who.int Text size: A- A + New Delhi: Hundreds of research articles, including at least 70 from India, that have been published in predatory or questionable journals have found their way into the World Health Organization’s global repository of scientific […]]]>
The headquarters of the World Health Organization in Geneva, Switzerland | Photo: Pierre Virot | www.who.int

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New Delhi: Hundreds of research articles, including at least 70 from India, that have been published in predatory or questionable journals have found their way into the World Health Organization’s global repository of scientific publications on Covid. WHO is currently investigating these documents.

The agency maintains a list of “global coronavirus disease literature,” which includes more than three million articles from around the world.

Earlier this month, an independent researcher spotted dozens of research articles in this list were published in three “hijacked newspapers” or publications which appear to “impersonate” a legitimate newspaper.

According to Anna Abalkina, a researcher at Freie Universität Berlin, up to 383 articles from three hijacked journals were included in the database.

“Ten appeared in the hijacked version of Linguistics Antverpiensia, 169 in the fraudulent edition of Turkish Journal of Computer Science and Mathematics Education (TURCOMAT), and 204 were published in the compromised version of the Annals of the Romanian Society of Cell BiologyAbalkina wrote in the Retraction Watch article.

Retraction Watch is a blog that tracks news from scientific journals, focusing on retractions, research misconduct, and other academia-related news that may affect the integrity of scientific research.

Pirated journals can impersonate publications by taking over the domain name of a journal that has been discontinued or by creating a similar-looking domain name.

In some cases, like TURCOMAT, the original journal is only available in hard copy. The hijacked version, however, publishes articles online for a fee.

Usually these articles are published without peer review or editing.


Read also : India likely accounted for more than a third of infant deaths worldwide in Covid slowdown


India documents

ThePrint searched the repository and found at least 70 articles from India.

Many of the articles do not contain the contact details of the authors, while others do not have the name of the university. It is possible that several of the researchers were duped into having their articles published in predatory journals.

Among the articles featured in the “hijacked journals” was one by Dr J. Yogapriya, Dean of Research and Development at Kongunadu College of Engineering and Technology in Tamil Nadu.

When ThePrint contacted her, she was unaware that she had published her article in a hijacked newspaper. “It was a simple article that I wrote, and my friend rushed to help me publish it. The university obliges us to publish in journals indexed on Scopus, and TURCOMAT was one of those journals, ”she said.

The Scopus Index is one of the world’s best databases for peer-reviewed and legitimate journals.

“It is used as a quality marker by academia. This means that the minimum criteria of the review are met, but it is not a guarantee of the quality of the review, ”said Soumyadeep Bhaumik, co-head of the meta-research and evidence synthesis unit at George Institute for Global Health in New Delhi, which sits on the editorial boards of several global health journals.

The UGC-CARE list – a list of journals approved by the University Grants Commission in India – mentions journals indexed by Scopus.


Read also : How the Covid pandemic robbed football teams of their home advantage


How “hijacked newspapers” work

The hijacked journals are those that seek to appropriate the legitimacy of the original publications.

Take TURCOMAT for example. Journal indexed on Scopus until at least 2020, it is published by the Technical University of Karadeniz, under the direction of the editor, Dr Adnan Baki. The URL of the original website that hosted the journal was http://www.dergipark.ulakbim.gov.tr/turkbilmat but the site is no longer active.

The hijacked version of the journal is an online publication hosted on the site www.turcomat.org. The editor mentioned for this publication is one Dr Mohit, who is described as an assistant professor in a computer science department in the Punjab. There is no mention of his university affiliation.

ThePrint contacted two speakers with similar designations.

When ThePrint contacted Dr Mohit Kumar, assistant professor in the Department of Computer Science and Engineering (CSE) at Hamirpur National Institute of Technology, he said he had received several emails from researchers around the world, asking why their research had not been published despite having paid the fees.

Kumar, however, is not the editor and knows his name, along with incomplete credentials, is being used without his permission.

ThePrint also checked with another Mohit Kumar, an assistant professor in the Information Technology Department of the Jalandhar National Institute of Technology. He too has denied being the editor of this newspaper.

Not the only case

An independent researcher who declined to be named told ThePrint on website of Annals of the Romanian Society of Cell Biology had several deviations.

“The website lists three different ISSNs (a unique identifying serial number for a journal). One of these codes belongs to a Romanian language newspaper, ”he said. “Also, the publisher’s name on the hijacked version of the journal is different from what was indexed by Scopus.”

He also said he discovered that several of the documents contained plagiarized text.

For example, an article titled “COVID-19 Future Forecasting using Supervised Machine Learning Models”, written by people affiliated with the KPR Institute of Engineering and Technology in Tamil Nadu and published in April, showed that 85% of them were from ‘other sources.

Up to 66% of the text was taken from another document titled “Administered Machine Learning Models for Future Covid-19 Predictions”, which was presented a month earlier at a conference in Coimbatore.

Upon closer examination, ThePrint discovered that most of the articles in these “backdoor journals” contained grammatical errors and typos that indicate they did not undergo the necessary editing processes.

Authors from SRM Institute of Science and Technology, Amity University (Noida), Andhra University, Chandigarh University are among those who have published articles in these journals.

WHO librarian Tomas Allen told ThePrint he was aware of the possible inclusion of hijacked journal studies on the Covid list.

Allen said the WHO’s Covid-19 research database is curated from known reliable resources. “We are currently investigating with other librarians on these ‘hijacked reviews’ and will respond shortly with our assessment,” Allen said. “We are about to compile the information. In addition, we will communicate our findings to the resource that is the potential source of these citations. ”

(Edited by Arun Prashanth)


Read also : Study Says Alpha Variant May Cause Higher Breakthrough Infections Than Expected


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