Fury, a leading medical journal, describes women as “bodies with vaginas”

A leading medical journal has been criticized for describing women as “bodies with vaginas” on the front page of its latest edition.

The Lancet has been accused of sexism and dehumanizing women after its editors used the term, which was written in an article titled “Posting Times” on the cover of the newspaper in an attempt to include trans people.

The article, which was published on September 1, examines an exhibit exploring taboos and the history of periods at the Vagina Museum in London and sees the writer using the word “women” but also the term “body with vaginas”.

The quote, which was then used on the front page of the newspaper, read: ‘Historically, the anatomy and physiology of bodies with vaginas have been neglected.

However, the decision to display the quote on the cover of the newspaper has been criticized, with some academics calling it “insulting and abusive” and “misguided pursuit of wake-up points.”

Meanwhile, others said they had canceled their subscriptions to the peer-reviewed medical journal – which was founded in 1823.

It comes just months after critics lambasted the Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust after asking staff to use terms such as’ giving birth parents’ and ‘human milk’ rather than referring to ‘mothers ”And“ breast milk ”.

The Lancet used the term, which was written in an article titled “Posting Periods”, on the cover of its latest edition.

Dr Madeleine Ní Dhálaigh, who works as a general practitioner, wrote on Twitter: “Designating women as ‘bodies with vaginas’ is a new low, all in the misguided pursuit of wake-up points.

“You can be inclusive without being insulting and abusive. How dare you dehumanize us with a statement like this? ‘

While Professor David Curtis, Honorary Professor of Genetics at University College London, said: “I have just written to The Lancet telling them to remove me from their list of statistical examiners and to cancel my membership and never to contact me about anything again.

“An absolutely inexcusable language to designate women and girls.”

Elsewhere, feminist Claire Heuchan wrote: “This framing suggests a coincidence that ‘bodies with vaginas’ have been neglected by medicine, as if they were not the product of discrimination and oppression. specific to the female sex.

“Medical misogyny… exists – and the refusal to recognize women perpetuates it.

‘Up to [the Lancet starts] writing about “body to penis,” dehumanizing and neglecting research specific to men, I’ll call this erasure for what it is: sexism.

Earlier this year, critics blasted the Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust after asking staff to use terms such as’ birthing parents’ and ‘human milk’ rather than referring to ‘mothers’ and’ breastmilk”.

The hospital unveiled a storm of “gender inclusive” phrases in an attempt to eradicate “dominant transphobia”.

Other changes included replacing the use of the word “woman” with the term “woman or person” and the term “father” with “parent”, “co-parent” or “second biological parent”, as appropriate. circumstances.

Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals Trust was the first in the country to officially implement such a radical overhaul of its maternity services department – which will now be known as ‘perinatal services’.

Medical experts and activists accused The Lancet of sexism and dehumanization of women after editors used the term

Medical experts and activists accused The Lancet of sexism and dehumanization of women after editors used the term

Earlier this year, critics blasted the Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust after asking staff to use terms such as 'birthing parents' and 'human milk'

Earlier this year, critics slammed the Brighton and Sussex University Hospitals NHS Trust after asking staff to use terms such as ‘birthing parents’ and ‘human milk’

Last year, law firm Clifford Chance said it was removing any mention of

Last year, law firm Clifford Chance said it was removing all references to “her” and “he” from its legal documents. (Image in stock)

But writer and screenwriter Dougie Brimson and Jewish Chronicle editor Stephen Pollard were among the critics who criticized the new terminology.

Mr Brimson tweeted: “Breastfeeding” and “Breastmilk” … Someone in this trust is undoubtedly paid a fortune to come up with this kind of utter nonsense.

“Think about it the next time you complain about the underfunding of the #NHS.”

Last year Tedx London, a volunteer-run organization that regularly hosts events with TED-style lectures, faced stiff criticism after replacing the word woman with “womxn”.

The organization used the term in social media posts announcing its upcoming fall events program, and later said the word was used because it was “more inclusive and progressive.”

However, the move sparked a series of negative comments, with critics claiming not to use the term female was “misogynistic” and wondering how you could pronounce “womxn”.

It is believed that the phrase was originally conceived by radical feminists who wanted a term for women that was not defined by the word men. In recent years, it has been used as a term that includes women who are not of the cis gender.

That same year, law firm Clifford Chance said it was removing all references to “she” and “he” from its legal documents in favor of “they”.

MailOnline has contacted The Lancet for comment.


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