Snapshots in time: December 26, 1895


The following are some short articles found in the December 26, 1895 edition of the RANGELEY LAKES newspaper. Merry Christmas and Happy Holidays to all!

(Pierce’s commentary is shared in italics, otherwise the copy was reprinted as it was in 1895).

The article below on the first page offers some great advice from 126 years ago, which we would all do well to take into account today. I like the metaphor of point one on the “straight and narrow path,” but maybe not just great advice on gifts for pastors or just for “young women.” All other points should be taught early in life as this is great advice for everyone …

Mode of transport for “On the river and through the woods in 1895”

Skeleton of a lay sermon for Christmas.

First.— Young women who plan to give Christmas keepsakes to their pastors should remember that the straight and narrow path is not an easy road to walk all the time, and therefore sturdy walking shoes may be more appropriate. than embroidered slippers.

Second.— Measure the value of the gifts you receive by the motives of the donors and not by their intrinsic value. Often times, when the proper standard is used, the most humble gift, costing only a few pennies, turns out to have more real value than the richest and most expensive gift.

Thirdly. – If you’ve made up your mind to give So-and-so a Christmas present just because you think you’re going to get one from this neighborhood, you’d better give up on the idea altogether. Christmas gifts motivated by something other than a desire to give real pleasure to the recipient were better not to be offered.

Fourth.— It’s a good thing to eat the Christmas goodies of yesteryear at Christmas time – rich plum black pudding, boar’s head and juicy baked goose – just like our ancestors. But if you have indigestion the next morning, don’t complain. Get out in the sun and walk five miles, or better yet, find an ax and a wooden log and fly the shavings for an hour or two. It is a law of nature that anyone who does not work physically does not overeat with impunity.

Fifth.— It is a good thing to remember that the Recording Angel is likely to make a greater entry to your credit in his books due to the gift of a half-worn overcoat to another shivering man or to a dinner party to a half-hungry and possibly filthy kid only because of an expensive jewel given to a favorite of fortune.

Sixth. – Christmas is the day of the whole year when the unpleasant traits of your character should be smothered, and it would be good for you if you somehow managed to get rid of those traits completely this year .

What follows next is a poem found at the top of page 1, which highlights the fact that in 1895 Rangeley (and the United States for that matter) were almost all Christians or just didn’t care whether a religious holiday was recognized. or celebrated in the newspaper, not to mention a POEM on the first page of the first column! The times have changed. It’s a lovely poem that captures the vibe and feel of our region at the time.

Christmas time

Once again to mark Christmas morning
The murmuring tides of time, their tumults cease.
For on that day a king was born,
The prophet pointed to the prince of peace.
The wrecks sing in the street,
And distant hills and icy valleys
Their merry Christmas is repeated
And hear the ringing of Christmas bells
Once again to mark Christmas morning
The murmuring tides of time, their tumults cease.
For on that day a king was born,
The prophet pointed to the prince of peace.
The wrecks sing in the street,
And distant hills and icy valleys
Their merry Christmas is repeated
And hear the ringing of Christmas bells

Below was found on page 3 on a regional treasure that is still sought after to this day.

A Rumford Falls jeweler receives many orders from various parts of the county for Byron gold rings and Mt. Mica tourmalines.

The “Gore” or Letter E.

Ms Lavina Harden, of Phillips, speaking of ancient times in the letter E. also known as Gore, says when her father’s family first moved there they must have followed a dappled line (a marked path through the forest) by Phillips. His father had the idea that the place would grow and become one of the largest cities in the state. Today (1895) there is not a family living in Letter E. The reason for the final exodus was that the Rumford Falls Co. bought all the wild lands and to get rid of school and road taxes, redeemed all the settlers. Among the former settlers, Mrs. Harden remembers one by the name of Ezra Carlton, an old soldier, (most likely a veteran of the War of 1812) who returned to the extreme limits of the commune to live. They had to transport their grain to Farmington for grinding. She remembers several cold seasons when they lost their corn and people suffered a lot from such years.

“Township E is south of Sandy River Plantation and is triangular in shape. One corner is located at Long Pond in the west, its border runs down to the Sandy River in the east. In the 19th century, it was included in US census counts. In 1840, 77 residents were reported; in 1850, 126 were reported. No report was published in 1860, but by 1870 the number was 93. Then, in 1880 and 1890, the population fell to 27 and 29 respectively ”- Maine Atlas. Have a good holiday and a happy new year!

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